Draw more, together

For a long time do I believe in the value of visual thinking. Clearly, not all visual thinking would use graphs such as Vithanco is allowing to manipulate. In fact, graphs are a just one approach to visuals among many. Clearly, the author believes it is a powerful approach, not least because it allows structure whilst still using additional senses over text-only approaches.

Ole Qvist-Sørensen was presenting his view on visual thinking at the TEDx Copenhagen 2012. I think it’s a great presentation.

I have seen the works of Ole and his company. We used Bigger Picture quite often at the company the author works. I can only confirm the usefulness of his drawings. There is something that makes you contemplate a good (enough) drawing unlike a lengthy text. Book his company or simply draw yourself. It is worth it.

Dan Roam has a similar message as Ole in his “napkin” books or in the potentially even better “blah, blah, blah” book. The latter presents even some kind of “grammar” for visual drawings.

How does Vithanco fit in? Vithanco is clearly less flexible than pen and paper. It is “only” drawing graphs. However, I believe that there is a case for Vithanco. Vithanco is useful as an explorative tool. It can help you to “think things through”. Auto layout will prevent you from wasting your time on arranging drawing elements whenever a small change is happening. The domains enforce that you stick to the underlying structure of the diagram.

Vithanco is therefore useful in a changing environment. If you don’t know where your analysis will end and/or you need to add elements at any point of time, potentially even maintaining one diagram over a longer period (consider for example a Benefit Breakdown Structure that should reflect your project throughout the project lifetime) then Vithanco is the right tool.

Ole mentioned in his talk how powerful it can be to work together on a drawing. I challenge you to do the same with Vithanco. According to a German proverb, four eyes see more than two (and a quick online research shows that not only the Germans have this proverb). This is so true when we discuss visual thinking.

 

 

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